Skip to main content
Search Icon
Agriculture

Investigating Carbon Accumulation over the past 500 years

Queens University researchers from the School of Natural & Built Environment, Dr Maarten Blaauw a paleo-ecologist and PhD student Gosse Bootsma visited the CAFRE Hill Farm in December 2021 to cut samples from peatland as part of an investigation into the Carbon accumulation in peatland over the past 500 years. Paleo-ecologists use carbon dating, bulk density and vegetation remnants to analyse for ecotope and peat accumulation levels.

Sample 1. Creeve Moor.
Sample 1. Creeve Moor.
Relatively intact moor which is naturally drained by peat pipes and has open drains every 60m. Surface vegetation plot analysis indicates 30-40% Sphagnum coverage.
Sample 2. Front Point. A wet moor with open drains (installed in the 1960-70s) 10 – 15m apart. A less healthy acrotelm (living layer at the top of the profile) is visible compared to sample 1.
Sample 2. Front Point. A wet moor with open drains (installed in the 1960-70s) 10 – 15m apart. A less healthy acrotelm (living layer at the top of the profile) is visible compared to sample 1.
Sample 3. Right Moss. This is a field that was disced and reseeded in the 1970’s. Depending on the season it receives 1 – 2 bags of fertiliser (per acre per year) with a sward of bent, ryegrass and rush. It is an important sheltered field for ewes and lambs particularly from March – May.
Sample 3. Right Moss. This is a field that was disced and reseeded in the 1970’s. Depending on the season it receives 1 – 2 bags of fertiliser (per acre per year) with a sward of bent, ryegrass and rush. It is an important sheltered field for ewes and lambs particularly from March – May.